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Horror Ink Sketches by Miguel Guerra – Lon Chaney London After Midnight

Horror Ink Sketches by Miguel Guerra - Lon Chaney in London After Midnight. Part of the Horror Ink Sketches series

Horror Ink Sketches by Miguel Guerra - Lon Chaney London After Midnight. Part of the Horror Ink Sketches series

Horror Ink Sketches

As part of our horror countdown we’re posting one new ink sketch every day. All through October, Miguel was caught up in a creative frenzy and drew a ton of Horror movie inspired illustrations! It was pretty crazy. Every time I arrived home, there were more black and white sketches all over the place. So, we’re posting all 25 horror sketches! 

★To see all of the Horror Ink Sketches, click here.

Lon Chaney Many of a Thousand Faces

“In his early teens, Chaney was introduced to the theater and worked as a prop boy at the local Opera House. In 1902, at age nineteen, he made his theatrical debut in an amateur play, and soon after joined a traveling musical comedy troupe. During this period, Chaney’s ability as a graceful dancer and developing comic actor began to take shape. In 1905, while playing in Oklahoma City, he met a young singer named Cleva Creighton. The two traveled and performed together, and were soon married. The following year Cleva gave birth to Creighton Chaney (or, Lon Chaney, Jr.). The couple’s early married years were rocky, and in 1913 Cleva attempted suicide by drinking poison in the wings of the Majestic Theater in Los Angeles, California, where her husband was performing. Though she lived, her vocal cords were permanently damaged and her singing career was finished. Soon after, Chaney filed for divorce and won custody of his son. The stigma of such a public tragedy forced Chaney to leave the theater, and he entered the growing industry of motion pictures.

…It is unknown how many films Chaney made during his career (the official count stands at 157), given that he appeared as an extra in numerous films at Universal Studios. He was so adept at changing his appearance with makeup — a trade he learned during his many years on the stage…

Two of Chaney’s best-remembered films are also considered classics of the silent era: “The Hunchback of Notre Dame” (1923) and “Phantom of the Opera” (1925). In both films, Chaney dominates the subject matter and etches a distinctive personality. He was capable of not only repelling audiences with his character’s visage but generating a tremendous amount of empathy with them as well. In both films, Chaney completely distorted his own face by using wax, false teeth and greasepaint. To become the hunchback Quasimodo, he faithfully copied Victor Hugo’s description. When Chaney was finished with the makeup, it was as if the hunchback of Hugo’s book had walked directly off the pages. The same was true for the Phantom.” [click here to read more]

Lon Chaney in London After Midnight (1927) 

Horror Ink Sketches by Miguel Guerra - Lon Chaney in London After Midnight. Part of the Horror Ink Sketches series

London After Midnight

London After Midnight was unfortunately destroyed in a MGM vault fire in 1965. “The film took on more than the status of ‘cult classic’ in 1967 when the last verified copy was a victim of the MGM vault fire. The copy that was housed there was destroyed in the fire and ever since then, fans have been scouring the world for an additional copy. There are some fans who have turned this search into something of an odyssey or obsession. In 2002, a reconstructed version was broadcast on Turner Classic Movies (TCM) using the original scripts and production stills. While it was not the vintage film that many had craved, it was better than nothing. Finding a bona-fide copy of the original production has become something of the Holy Grail of lost movies and is easily the most famous title out of all those that are listed as lost.” [click here to read more]

Watch The Many Faces of Lon Chaney

I just saw this and thought you might enjoy it from Dr. Udru. You can even listen to his voice in a rare clip.

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Horror Ink Sketch series by Miguel Guerra